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  • H&C NO. 1

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    The name on the ferry boat’s pilot house is H&C No. 1 which Ed Langford of Marine Supply Co. in Memphis bought from H.E. Bellinger of Tell City, Indiana who very probably knew our hero Bert Fenn.

    According to the news clipping on the back of this photo from 1954, the ferry was in the process of being converted into the MEMPHIS QUEEN, the first of a fleet of Mississippi River excursion boats that would later include the BELLE CAROL, the MEMPHIS QUEEN II and the MEMPHIS QUEEN III.

    The ferry looked plenty authentic in style before she was made over to suit the tourists’ fantasy of what an old fashioned packet boat was like.

    Additional notes are included under the photograph below.

    September 5, 1954
    The Commercial Appeal Memphis, Tenn

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  • ALCATRAZ ESCAPE ATTEMPTS

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    (All Rights Reserved  www.alcatrazhistory.com/

    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Alcatraz-History/177991298905290)

     

     

    There were, however, prisoners who decided not to wait for a transfer to another prison. Over the 29 years (1934-1963) that the Federal prison operated, 36 men (including two who tried to escape twice) were involved in 14 separate escape attempts. Twenty-three were caught, six were shot and killed during their escape, and two drowned. Two of the men who were caught were later executed in the gas chamber at the California State Prison at San Quentin for their role in the death of a correctional officer during the famous May 2-4, 1946, “Battle of Alcatraz” escape attempt.

    Whether or not anyone succeeded in escaping from Alcatraz depends on the definition of “successful escape.” Is it getting out of the cellhouse, reaching the water, making it to land, or reaching land and not getting caught? Officially, no one ever succeeded in escaping from Alcatraz, although to this day there are five prisoners listed as “missing and presumed drowned.”

    Following are summaries of the 14 escape attempts:
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  • NORMAN ROCKWELL’S SHUFFLETON’S BARBERSHOP: A MUSICAL–ICONOGRAPHICAL RIDDLE

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    © The Author 2008. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

    The tendency of the Vermonter . . . is to try to see how the isolated detail that comes before his eyes in the daily round is related to larger matters.

    —Dorothy Canfield Fisher, preface to Walter Hard’s A Mountain Township (1953)

    Since appearing on the cover of the Saturday Evening Post on 29 April 1950, Norman Rockwell’s Shuffleton’s Barbershop has been recognized as one of the artist’s greatest works (Figure 1).1 The painting occupies a unique position among Rockwell’s Post covers for its calm narrative simplicity: with the furnace aglow during a chilly evening, a group of musicians rehearse in the back room of a barbershop, providing a brief, anecdotal glimpse into their musical lives. No less a critic than John Updike wrote admiringly of “the coziness of the details Rockwell has chosen to illuminate, and . . . the cozy implication that at the back of every small-town barbershop lurks a bunch of music-loving old men; but the barber chair, the reflected light on the stovepipe, the crack in the corner of the big window the viewer is looking through—this is an amazing painting.”2

     

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  • HAPPY NEW YEAR 2014 !

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    Best_wishes_2014

  • CREAM OF THE CROP

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    now, you can find Boxing club’s picture in the  ”Cream of the Crop Gallery” on Cornucopia3D website.

    Thank you!

     

     

     

  • TIKI CULTURE OF THE 1940S AND 1950S

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    1940s and 1950s… The Heyday of Tiki Pop Culture

    What was it about the 1940s and 1950s that caused everyone to embrace the Tiki Culture? What is it about this kitchy Island lifestyle that everyone loves? Is it the Palm Fronds? Is it the colorful Aloha Shirts? Maybe it’s the food?

    Most likely it’s the Rum Drinks…. combined with a sense of fun and adventure.

    It all came together at a time when America was coming out of the Depression, and then was embroiled in World War 2 (and the Battles in the South Pacific). Island bars and restaurants were a great place to forget the cares of the day.

    After the War, the love of all things Tiki exploded into the culture. Men were returning from the South Seas with stories of warm water, sandy beaches, and a carefree Island lifestyle. Hollywood took notice…

    Stars headed to Tiki Rooms…. followed closely by photographers who documented their visits in Life Magazine. Tiki Bars like Don the Beachcomber, Trader Vic’s and the Tonga Room became “it” destinations. Music played and the Rum Drinks flowed. Movies were made full of women in Flowered Sarongs, and a singing Elvis…. suddenly, everyone was crazy for Tiki.

    Pour yourself a Mai Tai… toss some Beach Music onto the old Hi Fi…. and learn more about where Tiki came from…. and what it all means.

     

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  • 1939-45 SUPER SIMPLEX MOVIE THEATRE PROJECTOR

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    It is a little ironic that this first information sheet published by the Projected Picture Trust should be on the classic American projector the Simplex. Patriots should be conforted however by the fact that the man most directly responsible for the quality of ingineering in the Simplex was a Scot, Francis B. Cannock, who had emigrated to America to work for the Singer Sewing Machine Company. Cannock’s dictum, on wich the success of the Simplex was based, was that “The requierements of the machine fitting placed the thousandth of an inch as the limit of latitude; and on important parts ten-thousandths is the requierement.”

    Click on the image and move your mouse to rotate in 360°

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  • AN ICON OF AMERICAN CULTURE

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    The idea of an open air movie theater first phased Richard Hollingshead of Camden, New Jersey in the early 1930s. Hollingshead, who worked as a sales manager at his father’s company, Whiz Auto Parts, had extensive knowledge in automobiles. A motion picture buff, he combined these interests and envisioned a concept where people could watch a movie from the comfort of their own cars under the stars.

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  • STORE OPENING: HERE IT IS!

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    We are pleased to announce the sale of our products on the site Cornucopia3d.

    Our items list be avaible very soon, stay tuned !

    Please follow this link to find our products :

    The Happy Factory’s store 

     

  • CHARLES DAD BAILEY AND THE NEWSSTAND

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    Charles “Dad” Bailey opened his newsstand after his previous business (Luggage Store) was destroyed in a fire and his bookkeeper had neglected to pay the insurance premiums. His stand was very popular and he made a good living from it. He lived until he was 90 and kept the stand until just a very few years before he died..As far as we know the location of the stand  was on or near Florence in South Los Angeles close to USC.